Recovered gelato, from broken biscuits to cheese rinds

Traditionally, when we talk of recovery time we mean how long it takes your body to recover from an injury, or a business from a disruption.

But for Carlo Catani, recovery time refers to something else: food, and this period of our contemporary culture marked by exaggerated portions and wasteful behavior which we can ill afford to continue.

Recovery is an ancient art which must evolve in line with our modern food habits: our capacity to recover, reinvent and recreate is our greatest weapon in the fight against food waste.

WHERE TO FIND RECOVERY TIME AT CHEESE 2019

Photo: Tempi di Recupero

WHAT KIND OF RECOVERER ARE YOU? STALE BREAD, OFFAL OR ANCIENT RECIPES?

But what do we really mean by recovery time? For Carlo Catani, the founder of the project and author of an eponymous book, recoverers fall into three groups:

  • Do you make meatballs and omelets from your leftovers, throw your cheese rinds into your soups? Then you’re a Type A: you practice recovery by reusing, reducing your waste to a minimum and getting the most from the products you buy;
  • Do you think offal – whether it’s tongue, tripe, kidney, liver, spleen, sweetbread – is a culinary paradise and castigate people who throw away pea pods or artichoke leaves? Then you’re a Type B: you practice recovery before you start cooking through your choice of raw ingredients, from meat to vegetables;
  • Every time you think of your grandmother’s desserts do you find yourself in a whirlpool of melancholic memories and flavors of emotion? Then you’re a type AB: you care about the value of memory, of tradition, and what your own madeleine is in your Search for lost time.

So how is the project brought to life? By involving chefs, restaurateurs, and ice cream makers!

Illustration by Andrea Zoli

RECOVERED GELATO

There’s even recovered ice cream, which is the protagonist of a Taste Workshop at Cheese 2019. Recovered gelato boasts multiple identities: it may recover a tradition or a remembered taste like zabaione or squacquerone with figs, it may use products at the end of their lives like overripe fruit or broken biscuits, it may recover local traditions like the Roman grattachecca, or use second-choice products like egg whites instead of yolks or cheese rinds – and why not? By using lesser-eaten fruits and wild herbs we also promote agro-biodiversity.

“Taking part in the project is relatively simple,” as Carlo explains. “You can do any one of these things, thereby associating ‘recovery’ to a specific flavor. Or you can go further, working on more ingredients or committing to a reduction or elimination of single-use plastic and polystyrene in favor of biodegradable materials, or by using renewable energy.”

THE PRINCIPESSA

At Cheese the Principessa ice cream maker will be making a whole rainbow of flavors. We’ve heard rumors that there’ll be an ice cream made with the rinds of Comté cheese, an alcoholic gelato, or, to indulge Carlo’s tastes, a Parmigiano gelato: “Parmigiano Reggiano from White Modenese Cows represent my childhood, and the magic contained in a cheese rind.”

Come and join us together with Juri Chiotti, Alberto Marchetti and other special guests!

by Silvia Ceriani
info.eventi@slowfood.it

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